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20130201
20130209
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
all existing ongoing cia covert operations and with the exception of aggressive interrogations, endorsed all of them, and doubled down on a number of them. >> narrator: at the center of obama's covert war: targeted killings-- death by drone. >> the fact that barack obama would be the guy that leads america into this world of predator drones and navy seals and cyber warfare and sort of the dark arts of the special forces and the cia-- and that would be a major part of his foreign policy-- i don't think anyone would have predicted that. >> he's the first bel peace prize winner with a kill list. and it is very disappointing to his base. it is very disappointing to civil liberties supporters who thought he was going to be much more of a stereotypical liberal. >> narrator: in the spring of 2011, obama's covert war scored a significant victory. it began with a single piece of intelligence. cia director leon panetta had learned osama bin laden might be living in a compound in pakistan. >> the intelligence case was entirely circumstantia bodyaw oma b laden, had a full id on him. >> how
's mick to head the cia readies to testify this afternoon on capitol hill, calls for greater transparency and legal justification for the killings have increased. the outcry reached a crescendo on monday when nbc's michael isikoff obtained a leaked white pair from the government suggesting that the u.s. government can kill american set zenz overseas without any specific intelligence indicating they are engaged in an active plot to attack the u.s. the expansive legal framework set off alarm bells. >> every american has the right to know when their government believes it's allowed to kill them. i don't think that as one person said, that is too much to ask. >> the "new york times" wrote "it was disturbing to see the twisted logic of the administration's lawyers laid out in black and white. it brought back unwelcome memories of memos written for president george w. bush to justify illegal wiretapping, indefinite detention, kidnapping, abuse, and torture. "time's" writer david carr put it more success iktly. drones, very effective at targeting and wiping out rule of law. the ensuing uproar ov
, with more than 400 cia strikes against targets in pakistan and yemen. that's eight times as many as under president george w. bush. and now nbc news's michael isikoff has obtained a 16-page justice department memo that makes the legal argument to justify this administration's use of drones to kill terror suspects, including american citizens. the government can order the killing of its own citizens without due process if those citizens are believed to be senior operational leaders of al qaeda or an associated force, even if there is no intel indicating they are involved in an active plot to attack the united states. today attorney general eric holder addressed the issue. >> we only take these kinds of actions when there is an eminent threat, when capture is not feasible, and when we are confident we are doing so in a way that is consistent with federal and international law. >> yet, according to the memo, the government gets to define the word "eminent" in a very broadway. the condition that an operational leader present an imminent threat of violent attack against the united states does
to the cia fact book, literacy rate overall is 20%. given those numbers, how difficult is it your job of getting information to afghanis? guest: when you see almost 28% of the country is illiterate, meaning more than 72% mark is illiterate, that means we are faced with people they are not easy to receive things or digest things, so it is very hard in a country like afghanistan with the fact that more than 70% are illiterate, on the other hand, in afghanistan security, reaching for the people because of bad [indiscernible] because of the geographic afghanistan, it is hard to work, but it does not mean it will stop us. host: our guest abdul mujeeb khalvatgar is director of nai media institute. we're talking about journalism in afghanistan, how afghanis get their news and the freedom of the press in that country. we want to take your phone calls on this. the numbers -- here is the world news section of the "wall street journal." afghan peace still sought in six months. i am wondering, is this the type of headlines afghanis would see, the second to read the newspapers or have the newspape
. i watched the first whatever but he thinks that -- it does make the c.i.a. -- it is like -- i was saying kathryn bigelow wrote a thing in the "l.a. times." she talks about she doesn't personally believe torture led to bin laden -- but she said to portray that time without including it -- >> it wouldn't have been true to history. >> stephanie: it would not have been historically accurate. i understand that. >> it does make it look like torture led to it. >> stephanie: a lot of people had that view that saw it. we'll talk about what she said. we have tina dupuy. we have representative louis gutierrez. >> you yelled at me for helping you last time. >> luis gutierrez. >> stephanie: right back on "the stephanie miller show." [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: hour number two. current tv. jacki schechner, we were talking about the story about the tea party is at war with the karl rove g.o.p. establishment group. i don't mean for that to make me happy. but the other headline i just read, jim is republicans can't find anyone to run for massachusetts senate seat. so john mccain you see sa
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)